Tuesday, June 9, 2009

WATERY WEDNESDAY ~ 4 Mangroves

Feel free to enlarge for full effect.



Baby Mangroves are just like little single trees



When they grow a little older it is like a swamp that
is easy to get lost in but hard to get anywhere or out of,
with roots and branches growing in all directions and
disorientation setting in quite repidly.
These are in the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia,
luckily we have no salt water crocodiles here.
Mangroves mainly grow in estuaries and provide a
great breeding ground for smal crustacians and bi-valves.
Just click on the Logo and you will be in water up to your necks.

43 comments:

  1. Great WW pictures Arija.dingt

    There is an award for you at my blog if you would like it.

    A x

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  2. It sounds like the Mangroves send out root shoots so they're all related. Can you really walk around in them without getting caught up?

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  3. Such a nice little pond with trees. It would be so unconvenient to have crocs in there too.

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  4. Gaelyn
    You can, but I would not advise it, there are often leeches associated with mangroves.

    Chrome3d
    not so little, mangroves can cover very large tracts of coastlines. There are even extensive mangrove swamps on the northern coast of Adelaide.

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  5. Great photos Arija, so interesting.

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  6. I love the Mangroves. We have them here in the south.

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  7. There is something scary about mangroves, I think - maybe it is because we don't have them here. In fact I have never seen a mangrove swamp.

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  8. Firstly, I would like to compliment you on your glorious header photo. This mangrove swap look pretty good too!

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  9. Love your photos as always, Arija! Lovely little pond, I do think I would stay out of the water though and I agree with Chrom3d, it would indeed be so inconvenient to have crocodiles there!

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  10. I've always thought these were some of most beautiful trees, really enjoyed your photos!

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  11. These are beautiful Arija. I am most attracted to anything with water, I find it so life giving and welcoming.

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  12. Fantastic post. I love to see a mangrove with my own eyes someday.

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  13. Wow is that ever cool, great WW shots.

    Cheers
    Guy
    Regina In Pictures

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  14. GReat post for WW. Love that first shot.

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  15. Mangroves are very important here too. They help our coastal waterway to grow and prevent erosion.

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  16. I love the Twelve Apsotles and the mangroves I am repectful of them. Too many creatures hiding among them.

    As for you being in love! Ahah! I cannot stand to see you suffer! I must do SOMETHING about that. I am starting a remedy tonight! Hah!

    I love you, my dearest friend!

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  17. Thanks for sharing with us what most of us will never see.
    I certainly learned something.
    Lovely shots!

    My post is here: Carletta’s Captures.

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  18. Thank you for showing your world to me.

    I loved the comment you made in Ces' blog about crones.
    Beautifully put.

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  19. Beautiful post, thank you for sharing.
    SQ

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  20. It is fantastic to se that the tree will survive in the water I have seen Mangroves i Belize and in Bolivia.

    /MB

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  21. What eyecandy! I can't take my eyes off of the wild root system!

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  22. Very cool shots !!

    I love that last one with it's twisted branches and reflections in the water..

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  23. Great shots! Mangrove is something I really would like to see myself - the scenery looks so fascinating!

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  24. Looks kinda scary - I don't think I'd like walking around in there. That 1st photo is very nice, though - Very scenic!

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  25. Thanks for visiting my blog. Yeah, he might have a crush on me but maybe swannee is just hoping I'll feed him.

    I saw lots of mangrove trees ("walking trees," the native American Indians called them) when we were in the Everglades in Forida. Very unusual trees...great photos!

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  26. Great photos.
    The Mangrove seems to be very exciting.

    Have a great day

    Gunilla in Sweden

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  27. Wonderful images.
    Yes, some places need to be respected or one can get lost.

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  28. Very great WW post! The mangroves in Queensland are the habitat of the saltwater crocs indeed. But nevertheless they are very mysterious! Thanks for your photos.

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  29. We have the swamp... just not the mangroves. Do snakes love these trees as well? Great pictures!

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  30. Fascinating pictures of the mangrove habitat! The enlargements are great - wonderful reflections in the 2nd photo!

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  31. lovely images...
    love the 2nd pic!

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  32. Really interesting and I like the shots. Can you cross one section to the other?

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  33. 2Sweetnsaxy,
    the second shot is taken from a walkway that takes you to a path to the first.

    You wouln't catch me wading around in a mangrove swamp except if I was on my last legs stranded in the never-never without any sustenance. I suppose I would brave the swamp to find moluscs. Hard to say whether the benefit outweighs the energy of gathering and smashing open or not. One could probably survive if one had fresh water near by for a few weekd in the hope of being found. Not at all a pleasant prospect!

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  34. That is quite an exotic type of entry and I love the first one with the isolated pool of water. Very effective. Glad there are no crocodiles.

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  35. Interesting post and beautiful photos! I especially like the first photo with a little pond and the trees that grow in the water.

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  36. I have never heard of Mangroves before... it was neat to learn about them... what splendid photos!!!

    Hugs♥

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  37. They make a stunning photo standing there in the water...beautiful. The second shot didn't really have an impact until I clicked on it and saw closer how it looks in the water. I've heard of Mangroves but have never seen them.

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