Monday, September 10, 2012

OUR WORLD & Wild Bird Wednesday


Remember my New Holland Honeyeaters?


Well, we had a massive windstorm recently that, apart from 
crashing a great old weeping willow across the gateway to the 
main farmhouse, smashed two thirds of the all year round food
source of our honeyeaters and left our 17,000 gallon water tank
exposed to sight.


On the other hand, it did make it a little easier to get a shot of the 
muscle man of honeyeaters, the Wattlebird. This chap terrorises 
cats as well as all the other honeyeaters whose territory this is.

Over the last five years the wattlebird population has 
increased so dramatically that their rather unpleasant screech
rings out anywhere you go.


Linking to OUR WORLD 
and

43 comments:

  1. A lovely look at your world and some of its winged inhabitants, Arija! Beautiful captures as always! I do hope you're doing well. My thoughts are with you! Have a good week!!

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  2. sorry about the storm damage! but these are great photos.

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  3. Lovely wattle bird - wish we had them here Arija.

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    1. Careful what you wish for. They may be good-looking but their habit of dive-bombing cats and small dogs is not nice and their screech is anything but musical.

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  4. Sorry you lost the willow in the windstorm. The wattlebird is an interesting critter.

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  5. Attractive bird, though!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  6. Replies
    1. Nothing like getting rid of old wood.

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  7. Yes we are having our fair share of dive-bombingS here Arija, magpies, not wattlebirds. We have our fair share of native birds where I live, but the wattlebird has not discovered us yet. Best kept that way I think!

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    1. Funny, we have masses of magpies on the farm but they would not dream of dive bombing us, we're just like the furniture.

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  8. I am sorry about your storm damage. It is always upsetting to me to loose a tree or bush from wind or storm damage. Pretty birds and photos. Arija,

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    1. Thank you Eileen, the tree was dead already, it was however, a repository of grandchildren's memories of tree houses, pirate ships and rope ladders and a safe place to play in the summer heat. All three had a soft spot for that old weeping willow although all three are grown up now.

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  9. The storm was a lot fiercer in the hills than down here on the plains.
    I have a little New England honey eater who sits in my nectarine tree pecking at insects but the moment I move to reach for my camera, he flits away.
    Hoping you're enjoying this warm start to our Spring season.

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  10. And have you noticed how early the wattlebird gets up and starts his entirely unmelodious song? Well before sparrow fart. And they swoop our cats too. And on one wonderful day, crapped on the cat who was looking longingly at it.

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    1. Yes, they do impede one's enjoyment of the pre-sunrise concert of Mozartian tranquility.

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  11. That sounds like a terrible storm. I'm sorry it caused so much damage. It's not so easy to replace well established trees.

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  12. Oh -- that storm doesn't sound like a bit of fun Arija -- I can only just imagine the hassles you went through with that downed tree and the other damage. Bummer. That wattlebird is quite the domineering character!

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    1. Actually, those massive winds and wind-gusts felt rather bracing and oddly cleansing. It also felt like the whole house would blow down but didn't and since the tree was dead anyway and my grandson-in-law spent three whole days cutting it up and clearing away, it was as India said above, a SIGN to let go of the old and make space for the new.

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  13. So happy to see a post from you! Oh boy, it is always sad to hear about a fallen tree. I first heard of wattle birds through my Australian blog friend, Bird Anonymous who flew away into oblivion and never to be seen again :(

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    1. Always sad to see someone with whom one had good contact, walk out of our world. Luckily I just took some unpaid leave to recover from our recent traumas.

      I'm slowly getting back into my stride.

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  14. These are amazing shots of the birds. But sorry about the damage to the trees..

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  15. WOW....what a place you live. Love those birds. I've never seen them before....like their look:) Sounds like an active life:)

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  16. So glad to see you here. Lovely bird shots! Keep well.

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  17. What great phto's of those lovely birds.

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  18. Wonderful photos! Even if the tree was dead it's hard to see it go down, but then that's all part of nature.

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  19. The colours on the Honeyeater are fantastic. From Findlay

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  20. Those are gorgeous birds! Sorry to hear about the storm damage. Hope everyone is okay!

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  21. Thanks for sharing your views of this noisy resident.

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  22. Great photos of the birds. Sorry about all that wind - it can certainly damage things.

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  23. That Wattlebird it gorgeous as are the Honeyeaters and all those berries...wow. I hate when trees come down, always very, very sad. I am thankful that you are feeling better and back with us. love and hugs to you my friend!!!

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  24. Gorgeous birds...I especially like the smaller birds that are found in abundance this time of year around here.

    Sorry to hear about the wind storm damage. Nothing can be done, but to repair and go on with the days ahead.

    Silent Silhouettes

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  25. A lovely post about a beautyiful palce to visit!

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  26. Oh my, it sounds like things aren't as quiet as you would like. I hope you can get someone to clean up the downed tree, and secure your water again.
    That bird is beautiful though.
    Take care Arija.

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  27. Nice to see these birds, but sorry to read about the wind damage to the wter tank. Hope the repairs won't be costly or time-consuming, Arija.

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  28. Lovely pictures...especially the birds.

    Hugs
    Sussie B.


    http://pyssligasussie.blogspot.se

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  29. Arjia, that must have been quite the storm! Oh my! Nature is always reshaping the landscape! We humans are not the only ones to do it! I hope you are alright?

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  30. inspite of the screech he looks like a beautiful bird

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  31. Nice pictures - shame about the damage.

    The voice of the wattlebird is one only its mother could love!

    Cheers - Stewart M

    PS: I'm still really surprised that I find people who live in Melbourne and have never been to The Prom - they don't know what they are missing.

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  32. Hi Arija, you have got the screeching Wattlebird and we have the naughty miner birds, which chase every other bird away. In a way they are quite interesting as they live in large family clans.
    Hope all is fine, and you are well. Best wishes T.

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