Monday, January 19, 2009

MY WORLD ~ 13 Murphy's Haystacks

Click on pictures for a much better view.

By now you have realized that the Eyre Peninsula
is one of our favourite haunts in South Australia




A two day drive will get us to the hundreds of miles
of exciting coastline. On the way there are a number
of other attractions, three of these are splendid and
very different rock formations.
Let me take you today to Murphy's Haystacks on a
small rise above an extensive flat agricultural plain.



There are two large groups of these sandstone boulders
eroded at the base by sand blasting desert winds from
the north.

Just for size, marvellous me as seen by the Prof.

Mr.Murphy, being a provident man, liked to have his
assets set in stone even if they were made of hay.



The erosion has occured beause of the general
land clearing for not very viable farming pursuits.



In historical times, the general tree cover would
haveprotevted them from the biting winds.



It is easy to lose an hour or two just wandering
around these amazingly shaped boulders.



Discovering ever more interesting views while
wandering along well kept paths between shady
trees or marvelling at all the shapes and the
massive size of the different boulders.

My thanks this time are set in stone to the MY WORLD
team for creating this fun and exiting meme.

62 comments:

  1. Some of the most interesting rock formations i have seen

    An Arkie's Musings

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  2. Those are amazing. I would be wandering around for hours too! Thanks so much!

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  3. Truly amazing rock formations! They do look like haystacks.

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  4. Thanks for sharing these fantastic 'haystacks'. Isn't it amazing what nature can do?

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  5. These are amazing! They look fun, yet imposing too.

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  6. Interesting formations. I especially like that last photograph.

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  7. Those are definitely the most intriguing rock formations I've ever seen! I would surely be wandering around for hours as well. Your photos are beautiful! Thanks for sharing!

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  8. Those are amazing.I can see how one could lose track of time there.
    Blessings,Ruth

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  9. These rocks seem to want to speak. They are lovely.

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  10. Thanks for the info and pics, I would love to see those boulders in person.

    Cheers!
    Regina In Pictures

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  11. What a fascinating site! When I took a geology course in college, I remember how I used to look everywhere afterwards and marvel at the work of nature on our landscapes. It made me appreciate earth so much more. To be before such breathtaking creations of nature IS to BE. A religious experience.

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  12. fascinating formations. this is a great and interesting MyWorld, Thanks for sharing with us.

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  13. Amazing! I just look that them in awe.

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  14. Nature creates, nature erodes; a never ending cycle.

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  15. The shapes of these rocks and trees are just amazing with a great energy to them.

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  16. The rock formations look amazing! I bet you spent hours in tat place. I'd love to!

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  17. Hi Marvellous you! :)
    Nice pics. of an unusual place.
    two hours lost? you mean well spent!

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  18. That's really something! Those look positively fascinating. I'd love to visit. Thanks for sharing such great pictures and information.

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  19. amazing structures and of course beautifully photographed!

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  20. Beautiful place! And interesting weathering of the rocks.

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  21. Those were really fascinating! I was just cropping pictures of similar place that we normally pass in Nigeria, on our way south to Yankari. Will post in the MWT meme later on. Thanks for sharing! The greatest works of art - in my opinion - are often made by nature.

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  22. That's a kind of site I'd REALLY wish to see one day.

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  23. Wonderful world you showed us around, Arija! No, I understand that you wouldn't like to live in a house like the Sonneveld Huis. I wouldn't either, but as a museum I'd like to see it several times. I also like to see the farmhouses and dwellings of the middle ages, but I don't like to live there. I'd rather live in a tent somewhere in the bush, provided there are no snakes or nasty insects.

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  24. I haven't seen a lot of the Eyre Peninsula they are amazing rock formations love the last snap with the shadows on the rocks.

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  25. Arija: What a wondrous site to see, it was really put in perspective when you stood near the rock formations. Thanks so much for sharing your world.

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  26. How fabulous! I've never seen anything quite like those boulders!

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  27. Amazing formations! Never seen anything like it! And beautiful captured!

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  28. Wow, very interesting rock formations. You can't tell how massive they are in the first few shots so it was a good idea to include a person in one picture for reference.

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  29. Wow Arija, they look like they sprung up out of nowhere. Thanks for sharing them.

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  30. I can see how it would be easy to lose and hour or two here and to return again and again. Thanks for sharing. I want to visit one day!

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  31. Stunning, I would use up tooo many photos in the haystacks. Fabulous.

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  32. Wow! made me speechless Arija. what awesome! Thanks for sharing and for visiting me again...Happy Tuesday!

    PS- the hut in my post is without amenities...

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  33. That's amazing, it looks so green and peaceful there it is hard to imagine such harsh winds moulding rock. Great picyures, very cool.

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  34. beautiful rock photos!
    have a nice week :)

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  35. Fascinating! I've seen similar things in the American southwest, created in the same way. Not living in -- or near -- a desert, I sometimes forget that wind can produce the same effect as water when coupled with an abrasive. And likely the wind is even more efficient since there's not water for lubrication.

    These are amazing... sort of a naturally occurring Stonehenge!

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  36. What an interesting post ! These stones are so amazing !

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  37. Those are absolutely amazing. Great post and photographs.

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  38. Ola

    une superbe série de photos !

    une forme de rocher , très intriguante !!!!

    bonne soirée

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  39. wow...these are fascinating! What intersting shapes and so huge! I'd love to visit Australia sometime. Thanks for showing us this!

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  40. These really are very interesting formations. I like your commentary too!

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  41. Gosh, those formations are neat... I wish I could see those with my own eyes... fantastic.
    ((Hugs))

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  42. How interesting those things are...I hope you got some sleep and feel a bit better today dear friend...

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  43. Really cool. Loks like you also enjoyed a beautiful blue sky. By the way, I love your flower shots!

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  44. Australia seems to be a great country to spend the holiday for a week or 4, ... if I ever win the lottery ...
    Have a nice day ...

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  45. That was so very interesting to read and learn about. Your photos are beautiful!

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  46. Love the rock formations. Sandstone huh, the area must have been under water at some time.
    Great tour. I look forward to the rest of the trip.

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  47. Quite amazing. Fantastic photos of what can only be described as wonderful rocks. I just love your world. Thanks for sharing and for your very kind comments on my site.

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  48. Wow! That is one beautiful world you have there! Thanks for sharing. Thanks too for passing by. Enjoyed your post and your blog :-)

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  49. Amazing. I love those rocks.

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  50. Hi ... I used to live in South Australia in Adelaide for a while... and these beautiful rock formations remind me of Kangaroo island...can I ask... the name daturas?? is that the official name for the trumpet flowers??

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  51. That is such beautiful, interesting & large rock formations - really amazing

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  52. Very interesting rock formations. At first I thought they really were haystacks!

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  53. these natural formations are so unusual.. how would they have been formed to begin with?.. was the soil covering them once?.. They are amazing.. and I especially love seeing you there to give proportion to the whole site.. wow!!

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  54. Love these views, especially the one with the path alongside the boulder. It makes me want to walk here! These are so sculptural!

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  55. Beautiful Australia. Beautiful your World.
    Luiz Ramos

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  56. Truly an amazing place you have taken us to here. It almost looks "other worldly."

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  57. might try to do some prints from your last shot
    if that's OK with you?
    not direct copies just using it for inspiration

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